Wednesday 1 November 2023

A car is for life, not just for Christmas...

There's an article in The Daily Mail, which states that the second-hand price of some cars has beaten the price of gold, and also most of the stock market, in recent years!

Here it is...

Now, Scrobs is in his middle seventies - late middle age one might say - and we own a perfectly acceptable VW Golf, which has done only 17,000 miles in ten years.

It failed its MOT last month, because the rear suspension springs had broken - presumably thanks to Kent County Council's policy of encouraging potholes everywhere, and it now needs some new tyres, as we only do around 3,000 miles a year, and while they look good from the outside, at ten years old, they're begining to rot. The rear brakes need some TLC as well!

So by my calculations, I wonder if it's ever worth changing the car for a newer model, as this one does exactly what I need, the design is pretty timeless and it's comfortable, has a few bolt-ons as it was a Motability model, and it goes as fast - or slow, as I can cope with!

I could even walk to the shops a mile away, or better still, go by bike, so is there really any need to replace it - ever? The costs of servicing etc., are pretty static, it uses decent petrol as I only do short journeys and while a couple of things go wrong occasionally, the cost for repair didn't break the bank, and to quite honest, I really like driving it!

There must be some standard calculation somewhere, which tells us what the options are, and doubtless I'll get a call one day from the garage to suggest an upgrade, so that'll be fun as I like the owner, so I guess the best bet is to hang in there, and save the old pensions for a bit longer - maybe forever...

6 comments:

A K Haart said...

Our car will be 7 years old in March, has done about 45,000 miles and needed a replacement suspension spring this year but we have no intention of changing it for years. The car market is such a mess thanks to green lunatics that we don't see the point.

The Jannie said...

I read an article some years ago which gave the opinion that the most economical way to own a car was to buy a low-mileage ex-fleet Cavalier, maintain it properly and run it until it fell apart.

At the mention of motability: the memsahib is eligible but, doing the sums, we weren't willing to lose the £100 a month. That would be the difference between keeping and maintaining our car and leasing from them. When the time comes to change it it will have a value, however small, but at the end of a lease there's just - the end of the lease.

DAD said...

I have two cars, a 2002 Twingo which I use for shopping (I live in a village 10km from the shops) It is tatty, but cost little to run. I bought it for 3000€ about 10 years ago.

For longer journeys I have a 2004 Smart roadster sports car. Very comfortable to drive (It was designed by Mercedes.) It is 'immaculate'; the word use by the Control Technique mechanic (MOT test in France). Both have done about 120,000km, are cheap to run and maintain.

Why should I spend huge amount of money on a new car? I am 86 years old.

Scrobs. said...

Same here, AK!

I'll not be considering an electric car any time in the near future, or further on!

A good friend sent me details of an electric Ami, and he may even get one if they become legal over here...

Scrobs. said...

The Motabilty issue was just sold with the car, TheJ, so we just had the extras at cost, but don't have any involvement with the scheme at all!

You're right about the Vauxhall sort of deal! They have always been maintained, had 'the air blow through them', (old garage comment from a chum), and will probably go for ages!

Scrobs. said...

That's interesting Dad! The one reason why I wouldn't get a low slung car these days, is actually being able to get out of it, so congratulations on that at your young age!

Have you seen any Ami cars as above? They are cherged off a 13amp pug apparently!